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Civil-Military-Police Language Guide

Abstract The civil-military-police community is as diverse as it is broad. It contains a wide range of actors who employ a variety of methodologies and techniques, use unique equipment and often pursue different objectives in service of different masters. Diversity is a strength of the civil-military-police domain, although a common understanding is required between community members to realise that strength. The range of different terminology employed across the civil-military-police community can make it difficult to form a common understanding. Strategic level decision making should be driven by shared information and understandings. A Civil-Military-Police Language Guide can help ensure that information sourced from the operational level is precise, consistent and unambiguous. The demand for these qualities increases during crises. This Civil-Military-Police Language Guide is not intended to force participants to conform to any single set of terms; different sectors within the civil-military-police community may use different terminology. However, recognising and respecting the differences between actors is vital. The terminology employed by each actor can hold vastly different meanings, with implications for planning, preparedness and investment in activities such as training. Downloads View this publication on Academia.edu

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Civil-Military Working Paper 2-2013 – The Face of Peace in Afghanistan

Introduction This paper outlines the critical challenges in regards to the evolution of the Afghan National Police (or ANP). Rather than lessons learned per se, the paper argues that the lessons to be learned from the Afghan experience are that the militarisation or securitisation of nascent civilian capabilities is problematic. For a model of civilian policing to be effective, it has to be one that the community desires and/or accepts. For Afghanistan, this also requires a true unity of effort on the part of the international community in supporting an Afghan initiated civilian policing model, even if aspects of the model are not regarded as ideal to the Western eye. Let us start with the proposition that police are the face of peace. Downloads Civil-Military-Working Paper 2-2013 – The Face of Peace in Afghanistan

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Civil-Military Working Paper 1-2013 – Police–military interaction in international peace and stability operations

Abstract Policing is an increasingly important part of peace and stability missions. The word ‘policing’ suggests that it is civilian police who carry out the task, but recent practice has seen a marked rise in the use of more militarised formed police units, as well as indications that there is some acceptance of the use of military police or other military personnel in policing or policing-type tasks. Although some new academic work has been done on the militarisation of law enforcement, broader theoretically informed research into what has been termed ‘third-generation civil–military affairs’ remains fledgling. In addition, there is a dearth of doctrine and guidelines relating to police–military interaction in the field. In 2009 the United Nations developed pre-deployment training guidelines that describe generic roles for police and military personnel in peace operations, but the guidelines are fairly general and more detailed documentation dealing with the relationship between the police and the military in operations does not appear to exist. The aim of this project was to help fill the gap between operationally specific reference documents and abstract academic arguments in order to provide some general guidelines for formulating how police and military personnel should interact and decide on the…

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The Development of Civilian Policing: Lessons for Contemporary Post-conflict Operations

Abstract This article considers the historical separation of policing from military functions by outlining the key roles of police forces and analysing why policing was purposefully developed to differ from military structures and roles. In doing so, this paper contributes to our understanding of contemporary challenges with respect to identifying appropriate policing and military roles in international contexts. Focusing primarily on the Anglo experience of developments in policing, the paper also addresses the question as to why alternative forms of ‘Continental’ policing arose in Europe. In particular, the paper considers the question as to what constitutes legitimate forms of policing in such different contexts as, in understanding the genesis of current policing models and alternative possibilities for the relationship between police and military forces, we may hope to better understand the options for police and military roles in post-conflict settings. Dr Fish is an Associate Professor in Philosophy at Massey University. Dr Greener is Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Massey University and has published widely on international security-related matters; her book The New International Policing was published in 2009. Downloads View this publication on Academia.edu  

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Situating Police and Military in Contemporary Peace Operations

Abstract There appears to be a growing convergence between the police and the military of Western developed states. This has been argued to be problematic for a number of reasons, including the fact that this is out of step with current post-conflict peacebuilding efforts that aim to ensure a strict separation of these two agencies. This paper investigates the police-military relationship in contemporary peace operations from a number of different angles. It considers points of convergence and divergence both in theoretical terms and in different case studies, and investigates doctrinal developments that have been undertaken in recent efforts to demarcate these two roles more clearly. The paper argues that there are continuing significant functional and symbolic differences between these two agencies. Furthermore, there are practical and normative advantages to be gained from utilising police and military in distinctive ways in contemporary peace operations, and more needs to be done to establish what those appropriate ways for utilising those different agencies actually are in various security contexts. Dr Greener is Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Massey University and has published widely on international security-related matters; her book The New International Policing was published in 2009. Dr Fish is an Associate…

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