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Civil-Military Working Paper 2-2013 – The Face of Peace in Afghanistan

Introduction This paper outlines the critical challenges in regards to the evolution of the Afghan National Police (or ANP). Rather than lessons learned per se, the paper argues that the lessons to be learned from the Afghan experience are that the militarisation or securitisation of nascent civilian capabilities is problematic. For a model of civilian policing to be effective, it has to be one that the community desires and/or accepts. For Afghanistan, this also requires a true unity of effort on the part of the international community in supporting an Afghan initiated civilian policing model, even if aspects of the model are not regarded as ideal to the Western eye. Let us start with the proposition that police are the face of peace. Downloads Civil-Military-Working Paper 2-2013 – The Face of Peace in Afghanistan

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Counterinsurgency and Certain Legal Aspects: A Snapshot of Afghanistan

Abstract This paper provides a snapshot of certain legal aspects of the civilian-military counterinsurgency campaign being conducted in Afghanistan by Coalition Forces in partnership with Afghan National Security Forces, together with civilian representatives of bodies such as the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, contributing government and regional organizations, and non-government and international organizations The snapshot is taken in May 2011. These legal aspects relate to the Rule of Law Field Force-Afghanistan, the Afghan Local Police program, and the ISAF detention. Dr Paul Muggleton Dr. Thomas [Paul] Muggleton, BA (Honours) (University of NSW, Faculty of Military Studies), LL B (ANU), Grad. Dip. Legal Practice (QUT), SJD (Melbourne University). Paul Muggleton is a graduate of the Royal Military College, Duntroon, and is a Colonel in the Australian Army Legal Corps serving in the Army Reserves. He has seen operational service in the Middle East, the Former Yugoslavia and Iraq. Associate Professor Bruce ‘Ossie’ Oswald Associate Professor Bruce ‘Ossie’ Oswald CSC, BBus (RMIT ), MA (Public Policy) (UKC), LL B (ANU), LL M (University of London), PhD (University of Melbourne). Ossie is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Australian Army Legal Corps and serves in the Army Reserves. He has seen operational…

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Grasping the nettle: why reintegration is central to operational design in southern Afghanistan

Abstract On initial consideration, the idea of reintegration might seem peripheral to achieving the objectives of a counterinsurgency campaign, and that demanding surrender should be the order of the day, not seeking mutual forgiveness.  However, nothing could be further from reality.  In countering an insurgency the motives of each fighter and supporter dictate their adversarial actions, and the potential size of the insurgency is theoretically limited only by the population of the country itself.  On deeper reflection then, the salience of reintegration rapidly emerges as central to any successful strategy to conclude an insurgency. An enduring peace among antagonists in an insurgency and a lasting recourse to the sovereignty of the in-power government can only be properly expressed in terms that encompass the reintegration of the host society.  In its most holistic form, reintegration encompasses not only fighters who have taken up violent resort to obtain their own ends, but also fragments and factions in society that are disenfranchised, ostracised or otherwise excluded from participating in a country’s social-political construct between its government and the people. Lasting reintegration is much harder to foster and generate than simply announcing a policy.  Personal allegiances, misgivings, fear, and human and institutional frailty all…

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Afghanistan – Reconstruction challenges and dilemmas

Abstract This paper outlines the general context of reconstruction endeavours, identifies some of the specific roles that international actors have come to play, and concludes by discussing some of the challenges and dilemmas that the Afghanistan case has highlighted. If there is a key lesson for civil-military interaction from this case, it is surely that there is a huge difference between abstract commitment to ‘coordination’ as a good, and the practical achievement of coordination in an environment populated by a range of actors with diverse histories, interests, and time horizons. Professor William Maley AM William Maley is Professor and Director of the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy at the Australian National University. He is a Member of the Order of Australia (AM ), and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia (FASSA). He is author of Rescuing Afghanistan (London: Hurst & Co., 2006), and The Afghanistan Wars (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002, 2009); co-authored Regime Change in Afghanistan: Foreign Intervention and the Politics of Legitimacy (Boulder: Westview Press, 1991), and Political Order in Post-Communist Afghanistan (Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1992); edited Fundamentalism Reborn? Afghanistan and the Taliban (New York: New York University Press, 1998, 2001); and co-edited The…

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